what we’re listening to – roxy rule, ok?

well, it finally happened, because I’ve been going through many, many cassettes of early works for the dave stafford / pureambient blog audio companion page, my curiosity got the better of me, and I had a quick look into the “other” box of tapes – the one with the live concerts in it – and lots of other music as well – in it.

in particular, I was looking for (and found) a live recording called “foolproof” by roxy music – which is the first roxy music I ever heard, and it made a huge impression on me – at first, I didn’t even know or realise why I liked it so much (because a man with amazing chops had just joined the band, straight from his stint with king crimson, adding john wetton to roxy was an absolutely inspired move – incredible) but later I realised, it’s because wetton is the bass player, and that makes the whole band try harder. the presence of eddie jobson certainly helped, too, and the whole band really rose to the occasion – and the music, for that brief period, was truly remarkable.

roxy live was always a mixed bag, but this concert stood out in my mind as being more together, more like what the band was truly capable of, than other live performances I’ve heard.  and for me, there are some great moments too, for wetton – quietly singing harmony to bryan ferry’s a cappella end piece of “mother of pearl” – but best of all, in “re-make/re-model” – when it comes to wetton’s turn to take a brief solo – the monstrous, distorted, sliding, slamming piece of fuzz bass he chooses to play, is so extraordinary it puts all the other solos to shame – it’s fantastic – it rocks!

so I took the time last sunday to digitise the concert – and, at the same time, sadly, I learned that it’s not one concert – it’s two, and, it is (of course!) cut into pieces – so two tracks from a 1975 new york show, then three from newcastle, uk, the previous year, then back to two more from the 75 new york, then the balance from newcastle.

so even though the “concert” is contrived, it’s still a great representative showing of just how good roxy could be when they tried hard. in particular, the four tracks from new york 1975 really shine (now that I understand what and where they are) but all of it is fantastic – the other concert that was used, the newcastle show, is the source show for their official live album “viva” – so you can extrapolate from that that the band thought that shows from this era were good, too.  🙂

there are also some rarer live tracks here, that you don’t hear in every roxy live show, such as “she sells” – and one of my personal favourites, from the “siren” album – “whirlwind”, where phil manzanera pulls off a tour de force performance, in fact, phil is on fire through out this tape, and occasionally, the precision and power of some of his riffs makes you really sit up and take notice – “wow, I didn’t realise he was that good”.  but he is, and I think having wetton there was a kick in the pants for phil in particular (they seemed to strike up a great and lasting friendship after that in any case) and for the  other existing band members.

the bass player “seat” in roxy had been a revolving-door gig from the very beginning, but now, the current occupant of the hot seat, by sheer chance, happened to be a world-class bassist at the height of his performing powers (don’t forget, he’d just left the most successful and amazing king crimson lineup of its time – where playing with fripp for two years had honed his bass playing skills to incredible heights of capability) so suddenly, the bass parts in roxy music songs – began to matter!  you could hear them, and they made a difference to the songs.

this concert then to me, is sort of like roxy music’s version of “the move live at the fillmore east 1969” – a concert that vindicates them, that dispels any feeling that sometimes, live, they maybe weren’t all that together – and it shows us a sort of “dream” live roxy that really did exist for a few months anyway.  I love it, and hearing this again – well, I had it on vinyl originally, so this cassette was a master cassette recorded from the vinyl – but amazingly, given that it’s not the original vinyl, but a copy of it – the digital version came out very, very well – all it needed was a little bit of a level boost, and one very carefully done bass boost – and that was it, I didn’t want to change it’s sound too much.  remarkably, there is no evidence to my ears anyway, of the vinyl lineage – no snap, crackle or pop – but that may be because there are really no quiet moments – the audiences are loud and enthusiastic, the band, loud and on fire!

starting out with “love is the drug”, it moves through a strange selection and mixture of “new” songs from “siren”, including unlikely deep album tracks such as “whirlwind”, as well as a few big hits – “editions of you”, “do the strand”, and “re-make/re-model” among them – so really, something for everyone. 🙂

hearing this again, after so, so many years of not hearing it – it was like having an old friend back that you hadn’t seen for 30 years – a really wonderful experience, and, even live – roxy do rule – ok?

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the way we listen

over on the pureambient music group on facebook, we’ve been talking about the different ways that different people perceive a piece of music.  (by the way, please feel free to drop by and join in the conversation – everyone is welcome!). obviously, every single human being “hears” a particular song in a “different way” – but to me, it’s fascinating to try and understand what those “different ways” are, and if I am hearing a song in a particular way, can I break that pattern and “hear” it in a completely different “way”?

I don’t know, I think I can.  when I actually think about it, the way I listen to most music is strangely analytical.  instead of hearing it as a “whole composition”, I usually break it down mentally into it’s component parts.  so if I were listening to king crimson, circa 1974, I would think, when I hear the electric piano playing a distorted power chord during a live performance, “oh, that’s david cross” and I would be, momentarily, focussed on what david is doing in the piece in question.

invariably, a moment later, john wetton would pull off some amazing, sinuous, powerful bass run – and then, I am just hearing john, really – sure, I can still hear bill’s snare drum popping on the 3, or whatever it is he’s up to, but during this section of the song – it’s all about what john is doing.  and probably, I am at least mentally, if not physically, playing air bass along, trying to figure out what notes are in that incredible bass run – and probably failing 🙂

so I might listen to that song, and be in “wetton” mode, and pretty much pay attention to the bass, the bass, and … the bass.  on another day though, it might be all about what fripp is doing on the song – maybe he’s done something unusual, played a part in an odd way (compared to the studio version) or he might do some tapping (he does this more often than you would think) or some kind of impossible slide/hammer/whip round that I cannot get my head around…so that same song, is now heard in a totally fripp-centric way.

or – on yet another day, I might be in “bruford” mode, and while I can hear the rest of the band, I am listening to that tightly tuned snare pop, I am waiting to guess where the downbeat will fall in this particular measure (hint: not where you think it will!) and I am hearing the track “drum-centric”.

and – a normal person (i.e., not a musician!) would listen to this same song, and hear…a band playing, a song, not the individual parts, just the entire composition, as a holistic and organic whole.  after years of analysing songs, of focussing sharply on one player’s part, it’s become very, very difficult for me to just “hear a song” or “hear a band” as a whole entity, I have to really work at it to not focus on one element, and, it gets more difficult every year.

so for example, if I want to hear king crimson live from1974, let’s say I decide to put on “usa” – I know what will happen, I will be irresistibly drawn to “asbury park” immediately, because the drums in asbury park – well, if you like crimson, you already know about this drum part – it’s all about bill, and i’d say that when I listen to that song, it’s initially to hear what bill does.  that is…until wetton and fripp enter the fray.  then – my attention shifts – bill is still there – but now, john and robert are there too, and it’s hard to say which one of the three is the most amazing – not to downplay david’s role in the song, I actually love what david does on the piano here, but the problem is – john and robert are so fracking amazing on this song.  so I am torn – who do I listen to? who do I focus on?  that razor sharp guitar, that is suddenly blazing out 128th notes that are so brittle and sharp and they just fly atop that thunderous, murderously powerful bass line – to me, asbury park may be the single most powerful live performance by these four men that there is – although i’d have to think about that – I can’t immediately think of any other that blows me away quite like this one – especially in the first two or three minutes of the song – the power and the glory, wetton and fripp – and, underpinned by a snare drum that is snapping so hard it sounds like the drum head is in imminent danger of being split into a thousand fragments with each driving, smacking sound…

so some songs defeat my ability to focus on one element, and asbury park is one of those – maybe then, I am listening to that song in an almost normal way – almost as a whole – but not quite, because while I may not be focussing on a single element throughout the piece, I am probably shifting back and forth between the main players, maybe even every few seconds! maybe that says that I have a problem with my attention, I don’t know – either I am great at dividing my attention between various elements, or, I am unable to focus and keep attention on one attribute – fantastic !! 🙂

seriously though, I do find it interesting, the way people “hear” music, and as we were saying over on the pureambient music group on facebook, different people hear different influences in your own music, and that can be very revealing – when I get input from people, and they say “this reminds me of…bill nelson’s ambient work, “crimsworth”” or “this song reminds me of eno” then that interests me, I want to understand what it is about that song that brings that reaction – so I then go back and listen again as “see”, or “hear” rather, if I can “hear” what they are talking about.  it’s very strange that other people can hear the influence of artists that you admire in your work that you were not conscious of.  that always gets me, because when I listen again, I have that eureka moment, “oh…i see – yes, that bit does sound like eno, it really does” – which I might never have been aware of had someone not pointed it out.

that’s actually very valuable to me, for one thing, I don’t ever really want to plagiarise or create works that are too derivative, that sound “too much” like artist a or b.  that’s a tall order, because there are only so many chord progressions, so many melodies, so many harmonies, available – they’ve almost all been tried, performed or recorded over the centuries – so it’s really more down to other factors – performance, tones, ambience – that help make even an ordinary chord progression work well and sound unique to you.

tone and atmosphere are extremely important to me in the writing process – a piano, with no effects on it, is one thing, but a piano in a subtle, beautiful reverberant room – suddenly, the sound of the instrument starts to influence the song, and the notes, the chord progressions, the music itself become less important, and the atmosphere, which alters the standard tone of the instrument, and the timbre / atmosphere combination, create a mood that is somehow beyond the actual tune itself. the problem that this creates though is that I tend to want to hear that atmosphere or tone or timbre while I am recording – which is at odds to the accepted practice of recording “dry” and adding all effects post-production – oh well – sometimes, to get a particular result, you have to ignore what is “right” and go with what sounds right…

there are ways around this, and I am able now to record dry and play back with atmosphere added so it’s not so much of an issue now, but it used to be that I would just put the effect on while I was recording – because I couldn’t really play the piece “dry” – particularly, let’s say, if it was a loop recording of energy bow guitars – because the reverb or echo or phase shifting or chorus or flanger or delay was integral to the composition – and there are still times when I record guitar that is heavily effected – because I simply can’t play the piece live and then “add the effect later” – I just can’t play it without hearing the effect already there!

I am learning to, but sometimes…I might just do it “wrong” to make it “right” 🙂

what we’re listening to – special edition – the move live at the fillmore 1969

you’ve probably already heard my initial reaction to the release of this record, which to me, as a long-time fan of the move, and as a fan of late 60s pop and rock music, is a huge event…

I knew that the move had played the fillmore on their one and only us tour in 1969, because there were two tracks from the show on the 40th anniversary box set – two amazing tracks, that made me wonder “where is the rest of this concert?”.

well, the answer to that question arrived in the post yesterday, and I am now sitting listening to the album for the second time, I heard the whole thing last night through the “good speakers”, and now, I’m hearing it in headphones…and the excitement, the quality of the music…it’s just purely exuberant !!! an absolutely stunning, remarkable performance.

the story behind this album is one of heartbreak for one of the members of the band, their charismatic and incredibly talented lead singer, carl wayne – carl had always felt that the public really did not know or understand just how good the move were.  he believed, however, that the concerts taped at the fillmore west in 1969, in particular, proved beyond doubt his theory – but for various reasons, they sat, in his possession, for many, many years – unreleased, until in the 2000s, he began work on restoring them.

technical problems with the tapes frustrated these attempts, and really in the end, it was a question of having to wait until the technology had developed enough to deal with the problems that the tapes had – so while the tapes were being worked on, sadly, carl passed away, and he never got to hear the final product or see his beloved live tapes released.

however, his widow, sue wayne, and his son, continued the work, and with the co-operation of the rest of the move, the cleanup and production work on the tapes was done, the album was assembled and released last month, in february, 2012 – some 43 years after these historic concerts took place. so I found out, yesterday, “what happened” to the rest of the tracks from the concerts – they are here, to finally vindicate carl and his theory that these tapes “proved” just how good the move were in live performance.

don’t get me wrong, they are not perfect by any stretch of the imagination – the pa system at the fillmore, in 1969, sounds a little underpowered, and sometimes the lead vocals, and all the vocals, are a bit clippy, but given that it’s a 43-year old recording, it’s not bad at all !

you can hear everything, including the absolutely stunning vocal arrangements, the exquisite harmonies which faithfully reproduce the vocal approach used in the studio – which to me is a real rarity – because as a band, they were moving away from their earlier, more pop-oriented persona, to a much heavier, power-trio-with-vocalist approach – but not just lead vocals and a power trio – a power trio that can play hard, loud and fast – but sing like angels when required.

there are several a cappella segments, during “cherry blossom clinic (revisited)” for example, where the music stops, and you hear the move’s voices only – and then, the harmonies, are just exquisite, in tune and wonderful.

sometimes, during the songs, the harmonies do stray a bit, and interestingly, it’s often roy himself that seems to be a little bit out of tune – but I’d say it’s completely understandable – given the fact that it’s a 1969 pa system; the monitors were almost certainly insufficient – and, he’s having to play rhythm guitar, lead guitar, sing some lead vocals and sing harmony vocals the entire time while he tries to play those incredibly diverse and difficult guitar parts.

and since we are on the subject, let’s talk about roy’s guitar playing – right now, they are whipping through the “classical section” of “cherry blossom clinic (revisited)” and it’s just roy on 12-string electric, rick on bass, and bev on drums – but it sounds like a lot more than 3 players, it’s incredibly full – and then, they launch into the madcap “vocal version” of the classical theme, a bizarre and very difficult to execute vocal exercise that just amazes me – they are so faithful to the album arrangement, but – it’s live, and in many, many instances, the guitar playing far exceeds the original…

last night when I was listening to this on speakers, and roy got to the middle section of “fields of people”, and played his “banjar” (half banjo/half sitar) duet with bev – and I listened to the speed and clarity and amazing lead guitar ability of roy – and it struck me, ok, it’s 1969 – the beatles are currently making first, let it be, and then, abbey road – which are of course, brilliant, classic albums – but at that same moment, far, far from home, miles from the familiar, a 23-year old roy wood is standing onstage at the bloody fillmore west, proving beyond the shadow of a doubt, that as a live performance unit – that (and this is just my opinion, please don’t throw things at me now!!!) that they wiped the floor with the big three – the beatles (who had stopped performing in 1966 – because they couldn’t faithfully reproduce their more complex material “live” – which is slightly proved by the japan concerts where the harmonies are a bit lacklustre…) the stones (if you’ve heard them live at hyde park, 1969 – you will understand what I am talking about) – and the kinks – the kinks being the one unknown, I would say that they were probably actually the biggest competition that the move had as live bands go – the beatles were actually out of the picture, and the stones were struggling with the changeover from brian jones to mick taylor – so only the kinks were out there playing their hearts out – which you can hear on record – but joining them now, is the other “great sixties band” – at least, 43 years late, but I think that carl has now got his “proof”, and even ray and dave davies would have to admit, roy wood and the move were a dynamite live act!

and I personally think that this concert really does prove how good the move were, and it’s absolutely amazing that they were so unknown in the us (especially since they were huge in the uk and europe) – it’s just inexplicable, of course, some americans loved the move, and followed their music, but their records never really sold well in america – I think they arrived there too late, and the sixties were almost over anyway – so one us tour – and that’s it.

according to bev bevan, they had tried to go over to america a couple of times, years earlier, but something always stopped them, and it wasn’t until 1969 that they finally did make it over there – and then they played only a handful of shows.  and consider this:  they had one crew – one man, and the four guys in the group, to drive across america to california – so five guys, in a rented car pulling a large u-haul trailer with all their gear in it – this is the move we are talking about !  but – no limousines, no planes – they drove across america, carl and their roadie sharing the driving duties.

I find that astonishing when you think about rock and roll tours by famous bands now – what the move did was unheard of !  they flew to new york, went to manny’s music, and bought guitars and drums, rented a trailer, and started driving…what an experience for five young guys from birmingham!  it sounds like they had a blast, a week’s residency on the sunset strip, then up north to play a few nights at bill graham’s fillmore west – third on the bill behind little richard and joe cocker – can you imagine?

they don’t play like they are third on the bill anywhere, they play with such confidence, obviously, they know these songs inside out, they have done work on the arrangements – some of the songs are actually seriously expanded and improved over the originals – the ten minute plus “I can hear the grass grow” being one case in point, you have to hear it to believe it – it’s so far beyond the original single, it’s basically mutated into a mini-prog-rock-masterpiece – and roy and bev in particular are just extraordinary on it – it’s a monster.

and that brings me now to bev, I always thought bev was a good drummer, but now I believe that I was wrong about that, he’s a fucking brilliant drummer 🙂

his playing on this album, the snap of those brand new slingerland drums – his rolls and tom tom work is so powerful, he literally propels these songs into life.  some of the rolls in “fields of people” seemed impossibly fast even on the studio version, but here, they move at light speed – and I would spend a moment talking about this song, “fields of people” – first of all, it clocks in at an astonishing seventeen minutes (because of the banjar/drum duet in the middle mostly) but it’s an incredible arrangement, the vocals are just like the record – not easy to perform, but they do a very credible job of it – meanwhile, roy’s twelve string rings out so beautifully throughout – and then, suddenly, it’s all about rick price – he turns up that bass, and with a beautifully distorted sound, launches into the quick section that begins around the three minute mark.  every note is so well rehearsed, and it’s such an unusual and strange song, it features one of the best and most unusual lead vocals I’ve ever heard – carl is improvising, speaking lines, and generally showing us that he can do far, far better than the record – and then there’s rick with that almost chris squire-like bass riff…

and then it starts happening – the whip-quick-lightning-fast snare rolls – starting at about the five and a half minute mark, bev starts whipping his drums into an absolute frenzy, rolling across the toms so fast you think he will miss one – but he doesn’t, he’s precise, he’s fast – and his drumming brings real excitement to all of the pieces.

then – carl takes all the attention – by singing one beautiful, powerful long, extended note – on his own, a spellbinding, pure, amazing, unexpected, perfect note – that leads into an amazing, new, extended section – a bass and drum solo, that is just smoking hot – which is really just a bridge to allow roy enough time to switch from 12 string to the “banjar” (half-banjo, half-sitar) for what may be the most amazing moment of this whole show.

and now…it’s raga time, it’s very much like the album – only, much better.  and bev plays an amazing, ethnic sounding accompaniment on the tom toms, with mallets I believe, which does a great job of emulating tabla – it’s amazing! but what is truly astonishing is the powerful, melodic, prowess that roy displays on this strange instrument, he “gets” indian music, he really does, and this raga shows his skill as a multi-instrumentalist in no uncertain terms – he is in command, utterly confident – bev adds a bell tree for a moment – the drums become more and more fierce, as roy winds up towards the end of the song – the audience must have been glued to their seats, transfixed (i would have been) – as if george harrison himself had got out on stage and played the sitar solo in “within you without you” – that is what this is like – but the difference was, the beatles had become a studio only band, deciding not to take their more complex music on the road – but roy and the move did take their complex music on the road, and actually played it better than they had in the studio!

finally, rick joins back in on the bass, as the song comes to it’s dramatic conclusion, last night, hearing this for the first time – I thought, hmmm, I hate to think this, but, let’s be brutally honest – when did john lennon or george harrison (don’t get me wrong, two of my biggest guitar heroes) ever play something as amazing as this?  answer: never, and, especially, not live !!  shocking, but true.

I’ve never compared any guitarist to lennon or harrison, but I seriously think that in terms of playing ability, compositional ability, arranging ability (don’t forget, the move had no “george martin” – roy had to fill those shoes for the move) that roy, at the height of his powers, let’s say from 1967 through 1970, was unstoppable, and actually, the better guitarist of the three (now I am really gonna get it, but – it had to be said) – I am not being sacrilegious here, I have nothing but respect for lennon and harrison (especially harrison!!!) but you have to hear this – the banjar solo that makes up the last, I don’t know, seven minutes of “fields of people” live…it’s the perfect juxtaposition of indian and pop music, played by four men who were confident, committed, and clearly having the time of their live bashing through this amazing electric raga – astonishing!

when I first saw the set list for this album, I nearly fell out of my chair – reading eagerly through the set list, my eyes immediately fell onto three pieces in particular – one, and most important of all – “fields of people”.  I mean – I had just assumed that this song was a studio-only production, it had the sitar solo at the end, very complex vocals – how could they possibly reproduce all that in a live setting?  answer: listen to this album.

secondly, “don’t make my baby blue” – another “wow”, they play this live? moment…and not only do they play it, you actually get a second version on disc 2, so you get to hear this amazing, powerful song twice – I have always loved this track especially, it’s a real highlight on the “shazam” album, and again, I never thought they would play it live – but they do, and again, you get two versions – so it’s a double, double miracle if you ask me!!!

third and finally in the “knock me over with a feather” department, is the beautiful ballad “the last thing on my mind” – yes, once again, two versions! – and a really wonderful arrangement, with chiming 12-string electric, and roy faithfully – somehow – mimicking the reverse guitar solo that is a huge feature on the studio version – this track is a massive highlight for carl too, his vocals on it cannot be underestimated, in many ways, his performance alone “makes” the track, it’s heartfelt, melodic, classic carl wayne.  he clearly loves this song, and he really makes you believe that he didn’t want to let you down – it was the last thing on his mind.  roy plays it so faithfully, I just couldn’t believe they even played it live (i know, I keep saying that and saying it…i can’t believe it, I can’t believe it…) but not only do they play it live, once again, it’s really better than the original (if such a thing could be) – these performances, in really, every case, make significant or even massive (as in the case of the astonishingly re-arranged “fields of people”) improvements – making already great songs absolutely sublime – the roy wood arrangement wizard (pun intended) !

and for me, during this song, which is mostly sung by carl, there is a really beautiful moment, when roy takes over briefly to sing lead on one small section, and carl and rick switch over to harmony/backing vocals – just stunning.  roy does sing lead vocals in several places, and his voice, when singing lead, is really very good and I feel he’s quite underrated as a singer.

the 12-string lead guitar solo/reverse guitar emulation solo on this track, in both versions, is an absolute highlight of the entire concert, and the fact that you get two of those solos, from two different nights – shudders with delight.  beautiful high speed wah-wah 12 string freestyle raga lead guitar – that’s ok with me J

then, next, there’s an absolutely mind blowing a cappella introduction to “goin’ back” – another cover, like so many of these actually are (there are only three roy wood songs performed at these concerts – just three) a really complex and beautiful a cappella intro and then very sophisticated vocal arrangement throughout the song, which just flows by beautifully – another completely different musical experience…

I know this is already a long post, and I’ve waxed profound about how brilliant the move are before this, all day yesterday in fact! but believe it or not, I am really only hitting the super obvious highlights, there is so much to explore and enjoy in this 2 disc concert – for example, “hello susie” just rocks like a normal rock song, propelled by bev into proto-metal territory – “rock and roll the day away – come on everybody!!!….”

but it sounds fantastic, hugely fun, and again, i’ve never heard or dreamed of a live version of “hello susie” – and it’s really good!

the show starts and ends with a nazz (todd rundgren) song, which shows that the band were obviously big fans of the nazz (as I am) – so they start with a heavy, beautiful version of “open my eyes” – heavier than the way todd used to play it live I’d say – but the real gem is the final number of the night – a cover of the less-well-known nazz song “under the ice” – which, they take and expand and re-arrange to an amazing degree, until todd wouldn’t recognise it, but, it’s genius, and roy plays amazing rock lead guitar, with the wah-wah flying throughout, really beautiful, playing, as if he’d held back all his best chops to use in this song – it may have the single “best” lead solo on the entire record, it’s just classic rock, three piece, rick and bev holding down the rhythm while roy plays and plays and plays some more – it’s an absolute stunner.

then, strange things begin to happen.  bev changes up the rhythm, starts soloing a bit himself with some very snappy rolls, meanwhile, roy’s wah-wah guitar style is starting to threaten even jimi himself – or rather, it sounds to me, like roy had been listening to hendrix records the night before, and is having a go at some hendrix like wah work – the footwork is fantastic…then, it mellows out, and roy starts using the wah as more of a filter, almost fripp like – then, he starts playing octaves, with gentle feedback at the end of each, as bev and rick vamp along behind him, suddenly, it’s nearly jazz, but not really, it’s just amazing lead guitar – a beautiful, tricky section of octaves (never easy to play) and roy is revealed to be a remarkably complex guitarist, capable of subtleties that I never expected – this long, long solo really reveals so much about his thought processes – ok, it’s not perfect, it has a couple of tricky notes here and there, but it’s so good that it’s not even fair to really mention those minor imperfections…

and as the solo evolves, through this long, “quiet” section, then suddenly there are some sharp rhythmic punctuations, where all three of the players hit some coordinated “smacks” together – and then, it’s more freestyle, lots of cymbals, back to the super-quick-foot-wah sound that roy seems to be a major pioneer of, i’ve never heard a wah move so fast, but it’s not a one-trick pony, he uses the device in a really, really clever way – utilising every tonal trick a wah pedal is capable of – and now, the track veers into a sort of “quasi-take-five” sound – now the band is stopping and starting – the amount of work on this arrangement is staggering.

roy starts playing a descending riff that seems familiar, but doesn’t quite gel – except, you know it’s “norwegian wood!!!”…then, suddenly, we are in full on “rock” mode again, mad lead solo over insanely fast drumming, we are in the solo of “under the ice” again, after a five minute musical detour that covered so much ground I’m still in shock from it, the interplay of wah guitar of the most creative kind, and an incredibly able and sympathetic rhythm section that is utterly supportive of what roy is playing…

and what roy is playing on this final piece is almost indescribable – you just have to hear it to believe it!  suddenly – bev demands your attention with some drum smacks, and we are back, somehow…at the coda of under the ice – which draws the show to a shuddering close.

then – continuing on through the second disc now, you get the “extra” versions of songs from the other night’s performances – just three songs, three the same as in the main set – “don’t make my baby blue”, “cherry blossom clinic (revisited)” and “the last thing on my mind” – and to my mind, ok sure, I’d rather have the whole show – but I am nothing if not grateful for these three extra tracks, and the versions have some very interesting variations from the ones in the main show presented – particularly in carl’s vocals – which seem quite different somehow on the extra tracks – I can’t pinpoint why, but it sounds great – and all three are welcome additions to the pitifully small live legacy of the move.

the album concludes with a ten and a half minute track featuring bev bevan recounting details of the tour, which is certainly historically interesting if nothing else, a glimpse back to a remarkable time for a remarkable group of young players.

the move do, of course, have another live album, an album recorded early in their career at the marquee club in london, and that, along with the occasional very rare bootleg, is pretty much all we have had, except of course for bbc sessions – so one live album, and a set of bbc recordings – and that was it.  the early live album was fraught with technical problems, and it was originally truncated and released as an ep (i remember buying it on vinyl – “something else” by the move – with a shiny picture sleeve) but was later recovered and painstakingly remade (and improved and expanded in the process) for the 40th anniversary box set – but still, even though it’s a great album – it wasn’t really the detailed live legacy that the move deserved.

now that we have the addition of this “only” full-length move concert to add to the legacy of “something else” and the bbc sessions, we finally have some justice, a cohesive body of live music that truly demonstrates the musical prowess and confidence that the move had on stage.  roy wood, who notoriously suffers from terrible stage fright, sounds as if he is ultra confident throughout the proceedings – you would never know he was terrified from the quality of his playing.

but this body of work – if you were to sit down, and play the full length restored version of what was released as “something else” in the states, followed by the bbc concert, followed by live at the fillmore 1969 – you would really hear the full story, from the earliest days represented by the marquee concert to the glory of the fillmore performances – the entire, true and exceedingly beautiful live legacy of the move, live in concert.

now – if only I had a live version of “curly”…oh well.

…or “this time tomorrow”.

I came to the music of the move a bit late, I started with “curly” and “this time tomorrow” and worked backwards.  and then forwards, into the jeff lynne years.  but by then, the original bright spark, that was the move in it’s original line up, and in middle period lineups featuring both roy and carl, was gone, the addition of lynne did see a great partnership in wood and lynne, but the music they made was darker, weirder, and in my opinion, not quite as good at the move 1967 – 1969.

but when I heard about this album, quite recently, I knew that carl’s concerns would finally be dealt with, the record that proves how good the move were, now exists, for generations of new fans to explore and enjoy – and to my mind – marvel at – because this kind of music only existed for a very brief moment in time – the late 60s are utterly unique in the history of music – and the move can now hold their heads high and know that they have a part of that, that their powerful, sincere performances of a great set of songs that they knew and loved, are now available for the whole world to enjoy – and it would be my hope, that when people play “abbey road”, which of course is one album that is forever associated with 1969 – they will also play “live at the fillmore 1969” so that the other great pop/rock band, the move, will get credit where credit is due – for doing what the beatles wouldn’t do – going out there and playing their most complex, most difficult, most musically and technically challenging music – and doing it very, very well indeed.

the move have meant a lot to me over the years, they really have, I don’t know why, I think in some ways, they were a bit of an underdog, always falling slightly behind the more visible beatles, kinks and stones – yet, making music so unique, so creative, and if you listen to roy wood for any length of time, music of undeniable genius.

i was fortunate enough to see roy perform with the roy wood band a couple of years ago here in glasgow, and I thought, well, maybe he will play one or two move songs.  to my everlasting astonishment, they did about six or seven during the set – it was fantastic!  and his guitar playing – wow, it was so effortless, and to actually see him play the riff from “i can hear the grass grow” – that was an absolute joy, his voice was great and his playing even better – and I never dreamed in a million years I would ever see roy wood play live – it just never crossed my mind – but since I moved to britain almost seven years ago now, i’ve been so lucky as to see and witness music I would never have seen had I remained in distant san diego, california…

besides roy wood then, I’ve also managed to see van der graaf generator three times and peter hammill once (although I had seen hammill in los angeles in the early 80s a few times) being here enabled me to see the re-formed van der graaf at the height of their musical power, and for that, I feel eternally grateful that I decided to become british!

I also recently realised, that almost by accident, I have managed to see a huge percentage of the sixties musicians who influenced me so profoundly as a young musician – three of the beatles (all except john), the kinks, roy wood – and I didn’t used to be a big stones fan, so i’ve never seen the stones – although curiously, I have really started to like their music a lot over the past ten years or so – I guess it took me a while 🙂

3 beatles, 2 kinks, and 1 move member – not bad since I wasn’t really trying to see “all of the beatles” or anything like that – I nearly managed it anyway.  seeing george harrison was a profound and most amazing experience, especially when he sang and played a john lennon song – in my life – that was really something else!!! to coin a phrase J

for those of you who are not move fans, I apologise for this strange detour from our normal programming – the next instalment of the blog will indeed be one of our regular features…I do not normally ever “review” cds or other releases, but since I have a long, long history with this band, and I always felt that their reputation was sold short because of the way their album catalogue was a bit…mismanaged shall we say…and the lack of a cohesive and complete presentation of their live skill was mostly absent, it was important to me to say “a great wrong has been made right here” and I am especially glad that carl finally got his wish, even though he didn’t live to see it – thankfully, the musical legacy, the power and the glory of the move in live performance mode, is now preserved in digital format for generations to come, for them to enjoy.

bless carl too, for keeping those tapes all those years, for working to get them restored, and for believing in the project enough to at least plant the seeds that later got the project done – or else we would have been left with little indeed to remember this very talented group of guys by.  and that would have been a real shame.

I like it when the little guy wins – and carl really wanted the world to have a better opinion of his band than they did – he knew they had been sold short – and he set out to rectify that.  I believe this album proves his theory, and rectifies that shortselling in an absolutely complete and devastating fashion.

last night, hearing the whole concert, played loud, I was just enthralled, each new moment of music (music played on a stage, 43 years ago, in california) a huge surprise, the twists and turns of the “new” arrangements, the expanded and altered arrangements, the amazing quality of roy and bev’s playing – even rick on the bass is a revelation at times – and carl, the glue that holds the whole thing together – the focal point, a determined, serious, individualistic singer who had a dream about proving just how good his band was to the whole world.

sometimes, dreams do come true!

🙂

thank you for indulging me here…next time, it’s back to our regularly scheduled programming 🙂

what we’re listening to

frank zappa, who I started listening to when I was 15, so that would have put it around early 1974, is absolutely in my top five guitarists of all time (not that I could say who those are at any given moment…). the first album I ever heard by frank was “apostrophe” which blew me away then and it blows me away now – the guitar work alone is astonishing, and yes, OK, this is maybe not the best version of the mothers (the late 60s / early 70s versions of the band were probably better than the apostrophe band, but to me, the music was no less remarkable) but when it’s your first album by an artist, it occupies a special place in your heart.

only it wasn’t actually on an album – it was actually an 8 track tape belonging to one of the guys in the guitar house…and I always found it really frustrating to listen to “st. alphonso’s pancake breakfast” because right at the most exciting moment of the solo, when the synth and the marimba are playing at lightning speed in unison…the eight track’s volume faded down to zero briefly while it “turned over” so you missed the best part of the solo!  it wasn’t until many, many years later, when I finally bought the album on CD for the first time, that I heard that solo properly, although I half-expected the volume to go down at that point.

apostrophe absolutely does have a huge place in my heart, from the beautiful melodies and piano of uncle remus, to the rocking jack bruce fuzz bass and zappa guitar on the title track to the aforementioned remarkable synth-and-marimba “schizoid man style” precision solo during “st. alphonso’s pancake breakfast” there is not a dull moment on this record, and for me, zappa was the odd man out of guitarists, there was no one like him, and maybe never, ever will be again – with one possible exception: his son dweezil, who has become a force to be reckoned with playing his father’s music in his own band, “zappa plays zappa”.

the old saying “like father, like son” was never more appropriate, and watching and listening to dweezil grow as a player has been an amazing experience – frank would be so, so proud.

frank was utterly unique, and had a playing style that developed at an absolutely mind-boggling pace, even as a very young man, he already had very respectable chops, but as you listen to his lead guitar style through the mid-sixties, it is almost as if he had been given some kind of mysterious guitar/dna growth hormone – until by the late 60s, he was rivalled, in america at least, only by jimi hendrix.  in britain and europe, there was some strong competition, mostly from people like robert fripp or steve howe, but in america – zappa reigned supreme.

then probably the most amazing few years of his development occurred, from 1970 – 1974, for my money, in 1974, all there really was in the world of truly intelligent, truly remarkable young lead guitarists was zappa and fripp – since jimi was by that time gone.  zappa was innovating on top of the innovations of those who went before him, those amazing guitar tones, the use of the pignose amps on apostrophe…and his amazing ability as a composer and arranger and bandleader – he was unsurpassed.  and then…there was the way he played lead guitar.

sure, we still had todd rundgren, and steve howe, and steve hackett emerged as a contender in the world of prog rock, and steve morse, the third steve, and so many other brilliant guitarists in the early 70s…but when frank started playing the guitar, you stopped what you were doing, and you listened.

and frank shone equally well in the studio and in live performance, one particular favourite show of mine is the live swedish television broadcast from august 21, 1973, where the band is astonishing…but frank is even better – you can catch most of this performance on youtube – and I could watch it over and over again, even just to listen to zappa and violinist jean-luc ponty trading solos – sublime!

words aren’t really the right thing to use to describe the guitar prowess of frank zappa, the only way you can really experience is to listen to the albums, watch the videos – and try to learn something in the process.  listen, and prepare to realise that you know nothing about the guitar – nothing.

we’ll absolutely delve further into the music of frank zappa and talk a lot more about his guitar playing in future editions of “what we’re listening to” – but if you haven’t listened to frank properly – do yourself a favour and try a few albums for yourself – you may be surprised.

what we’re listening to

aka favourite musicians and albums

another topic that I feel is worthy of it’s own mini-series within the larger context of the blog, is the work of other musicians, and their influence on the music and my own playing style.

I spend a significant amount of time listening to music, over the years I have built up a modestly large collection of music now, on cd and also in portable mp3 format, and during times when I cannot actually work on my own music, I listen, for many hours a day sometimes, to the recorded works of other musicians.

as a musician, I have a sort-of multi-tiered listening experience, which ranges from pure enjoyment, mindless enjoyment, music to just put on and enjoy with no other agenda or purpose – to deep analysis of individual player’s parts within a piece within an album – the detailed nuances of certain preferred players, which I listen to perhaps with a keener ear (always wanting to learn something new about my chosen instrument) than if I am just listening to something for pleasure.

there can be a profound difference in the experience of music too, some music just seeps into your consciousness (such as ambient, I am thinking now of the classic ambient albums by brian eno, such as “thursday afternoon” or “music for airports”) while other music uses almost a beat-down-the-door/sledgehammer approach to get it’s message to your brain (for example, mahavishnu orchestra, right now, I happen to be listening to a blistering live version of “birds of fire” which is absolutely demanding my complete attention – no seeping into consciousness there – it’s more like “listen to this!!!”)…so different music places different demands on the brain.

I sometimes do find it very, very hard to just “listen” to music – although if I am very relaxed, I certainly can – so sometimes these two listening styles merge, and I am both listening for sheer pleasure, while at the same time, I am analysing like mad with another part of my mind – how did that person do that? what scale was that? can I learn that riff and integrate it into my vocabulary? can I make that sound using the devices I currently have to modify the sound of my guitar? how was that effect created? what device was used to create that sound? and so on – it is sometimes difficult to actually turn all those questions off 🙂

I also have a somewhat strange view of music where I might enjoy the music of a certain band, not so much because I really like that band, but because of one particular player that is in the band that I do like very much, so possibly, when I put an album on by certain bands, it’s not that band or that album I really want to hear – it’s that particular musician playing a particular instrument that I admire or am interested in, and I want to hear them play – so I might even dislike the rest of the band! but I persevere, because I want to listen to and learn from a particular individual that I “follow”. it might even not be a guitarist, I might listen to one band because I love the bass player, or I think they have a unique or particularly interesting keyboardist – it could be anything or anyone.

that specific quirk of mine, picking out individual musicians and “following them” on to other albums and bands, and even guest appearances on totally unrelated releases, actually led me to discover a lot of great music that I might not have otherwise listened to.  most people learn about bands they like through certain well-established “methods”:  they hear it on the radio, they hear it in their local record store, they hear it online, or – from peers, a friend told them, they read a review, it could be a number of things.

but for me, this “follow one individual method” is yet another way to find new music and new bands, here is an example of a real chain of events that got me, eventually, from brian eno to split enz…with phil manzanera really being the key:

brian eno, I first heard him on the album “801 live” – but I had all the early solo albums from “warm jets” onwards…

same for phil, first heard him either on a Roxy bootleg or on 801 live, had all his solo albums…

so, working backwards:

  • 801 leads to eno and manzanera
  • eno and manzanera leads to roxy music
  • roxy music leads back to phil manzanera solo albums
  • phil manzanera has tim finn (and neil finn and eddie rayner) as guests on the “k-scope” album
  • tim finn leads to … split enz – starting with the first album, “mental notes” – and then I just kept buying their records, because they were all superb!

so thanks to hearing 801, I also subsequently worked my way to roxy music, phil manzanera, eno, and split enz – not to mention godley & crème who also guested on phil manzanera albums – but whom I had to got to through early 10cc – so all roads lead to phil it would seem…

I would find a musician I enjoyed, and I would just buy any and every record they performed on, and that would lead to other interesting sounding musicians – I loved tim finn’s vocals on the “k-scope” album, so I found out what band he was from…tracked those records down (and found an even more rewarding batch of records by a phenomenally talented group, early split enz), and so on…a fantastic, and very, very rewarding, process of musical discovery…all down to following single musicians from album to album, band to band!

once you start doing this, you kinda don’t need radio play or even word of mouth (although word of mouth can be a very rewarding and valuable method of learning about great artists, musicians or bands) – you just keep getting more and more spin-off artists that you can then follow down their own paths to discover still more – it never ends.

right now, lately, I seem to be in a heavy “lead guitarists” phase of listening: I’ve been listening to a lot of frank zappa; a lot of jimi hendrix; and a smattering of john mclaughlin (mahavishnu orchestra – this morning’s listening) – I don’t really ever get tired of this kind of music, and I could listen to jimi or frank play for days on end and not get tired of their very individual styles.

I think what we’ll do then is, in a similar vein to the historical aspect of the “journey through the past” series, we will use the “what we’re listening to” moniker whenever we want to chat about what’s currently on the stereo, or on our ipod playlist, at any particular moment…

…which this past week or so, has happened to be mass quantities of live jimi hendrix:  first, the complete winterland concerts which is a fantastic “three-shows two-shows-a-night” of the experience live in 1968, and it’s fascinating to hear the band play six shows in a row, and the variations between the six shows…including some real oddities, like a guest flautist on “are you experienced?”.

as well as the winterland shows, we’ve also been listening to a collection of hendrix shows from scandinavia, basically, every show hendrix played in sweden or denmark during 1967 – 1970, and within those tapes was a real surprise; though marred by poor sound quality, I was absolutely blown away by the amazing fact that in one of the early shows, around the time of the release of the “axis: bold as love” album, that the band actually performed the first three tracks from “axis” – including the spoken dialogue and feedback strangeness of track 1 “exp”, in the exact, correct sequence of what was side one of the original vinyl album – and I did a double take when I saw the track listing:

1)      exp

2)      up from the skies

3)      spanish castle magic

because I had always assumed that both “exp” and “up from the skies” were studio creations – and that turns out to be an incorrect assumption, because the band played through all three tracks, in order, before breaking off the sequence and moving to an older track from the first album.

even with the poor sound quality, hearing jimi play the part of the arriving space alien in the live spoken word dialogue of “exp” was a remarkable experience, and then, once the dialogue part was over, jumping in with his guitar and doing a credible imitation of the feedback sequence – very similar to the record – on this amazing piece of history. the version of  “up from the skies” was also a real treat, with jimi continuing in his role of the space traveller returning to “find the stars misplaced…” – and playing awesome, clean wah-wah guitars as well.

obviously, as with many guitarists from my generation, jimi hendrix had a huge, huge influence on me as a young guitarist and even up until the present day, because even now I am hearing recordings I wasn’t previously privy too, and sort of re-discovering the amazing guitar work of jimi hendrix – and enjoying every moment – certainly jimi is one of the most influential and remarkable musicians of our time.

next time on “what we’re listening to”: a completely different but contemporary guitarist to hendrix, with a unique and remarkable talent: frank zappa.